Starting your first bonsai tree is the first step of a satisfying process for a beginning grower.
The amount of effort you can put into growing your bonsai, whether you will grow it inside or
outdoors, and the maturity of your first tree are three important things you will want to
consider as you plan to cultivate your first tree.

  1. How much effort do you want to put in?
    Think about how much time you have to spend on the basic care of your growing plant. You
    will want to allow sufficient time for mindful and frequent observation of your tree. Keeping
    a bonsai healthy means keeping an eye on a few key things.
    Since the tree grows in a shallow dish, the soil can dry out fast. You will need to monitor
    the soil regularly to maintain proper moisture.
    As you get to know your bonsai, you’ll need to monitor its health. Through close and
    careful observation of the tree, you’ll learn to spot any scars or blemishes on the skin that
    require your attention. You will need to spend time making careful corrective actions, such
    as repositioning branches or wire.
    As a beginner, you’ll be eager to spend more time on the process as you watch your bonsai
    respond to your care, so make sure you allow for plenty.
  2. Will you be growing Indoor or outdoor bonsai?
    Are you going to grow an indoor or outdoor bonsai? Knowing the true difference between
    the two is helpful, as many people have a misconception as to what the terms really mean.
    Indoor trees.
    Typically, an indoor bonsai means a more tropical species that will likely require certain
    adjustments to the environment in order to do well. You’ll want to consider this when it
    comes to selecting the right indoor plant for you. Tropical bonsai need intense light for
    a significant number of hours each day, so where you place the container is an
    important factor. A bright spot near a southward-facing spot is ideal. But even in areas
    with a sunny, southern exposure, artificial light is often needed to bring the intensity up
    to sufficient levels for bonsai to thrive. It probably goes without saying that tropical
    plants need warmer temperatures, as well, so adjusting heating conditions will be
    essential.
    {INSERT PICTURES OF EXAMPLES on Amazon}
    Ficus, Jade and Fukien Tea trees are a few examples of popular indoor bonsai, but there
    are many more.

Learn more about indoor bonsai trees [INSERT LINK to read more on our “indoor bonsai
page”}.

Outdoor trees:
Temperate trees that go through a yearly growth cycle and require a dormancy period in
order to prepare for those cycles are outdoor trees. Be sure to consider the conditions
where you live in order to choose a bonsai that can thrive in that particular environment.
Certain varieties have sensitivities to intense heat or light; others shouldn’t be subjected to
frost conditions. Be sure to read up and understand what outdoor bonsai will do best in the
climate where you live.
Some examples of outdoor bonsai include gardenia, Chinese elm and dawn redwood. Learn
more about outside bonsai here. [INSERT LINK to read more on our “outdoor bonsai
page”}.

{Insert pictures and examples at Amazon}

  1. What are you going to start with?
    Now that you know what type of bonsai you wish to grow, you can choose the form or level
    and maturity level of the beginner tree that you are going to work with. Think about the
    level of effort you are going to dedicate to the process as you decide. There are a handful
    of options for starting a bonsai – three to be exact.
     You might begin with a pre-made bonsai scape
    A pre-made bonsai scape is a pre-potted tree in a container-garden environment, such
    as you might find in a nursery or flower shop. The plant is already aesthetically arranged
    in the pot and soil mediums in which it is intended to initially live. The shaping process
    has already been started and the tree has already been partially trained. As the new
    owner, you will take over this process, continuing to shape and direct the bonsai as it
    matures.
    Your pre-made bonsai scape will continue to develop as you continue to sculpt and care
    for it. There may be an advantage to working with a tree that is already accustomed to
    being pruned and tied. But a new bonsai gardener might want the learning experience
    of participating in the training process. Keep that in mind when choosing your starter
    material.

Learn more about pre-made bonsai scapes here [INSERT LINK to read more on our “pre-
made bonsai scapes page”}.
{INSERT examples with pics and links to them on amazon)

 Another starter option is a pre-bonsai tree
Pre-bonsai is a young tree that’s already growing and ready to train. Part of your job
will be to give this young tree a new home, in an appropriate shallow container and soil
medium. As its first and primary trainer, your care and devotion is critical to the
development of the young tree, as well as to the development of your skill and ability as
a bonsai grower. Click {insert link to “pre made bonsai scape page} to learn more about
growing prebonsai.
Make sure you have the proper materials and techniques for sculpting and positioning
your plant, which will involve three basic things: pruning, wiring and repotting. Click the
links to learn more about caring for your bonsai. [LINKS]

[insert three examples and links on Amazon]

 Your third starter option is to begin your bonsai tree from seed.
Growing a tree from seed to shoot to a tree that is ready to form and train as
bonsai is a longer and more involved process than the previous options that are
mentioned. As a beginner, this is where the learning curve will be at its greatest,
as the steps involved in raising a tree from a seed require a greater length of
time and know-how. All of this must occur before getting to the process of
sculpting the actual tree. Study up on the process before getting started. You
can learn more here trees [INSERT LINK to read more on our “pre bonsai scape
page”}.
As you know, bonsai is a process and a journey, rather than a destination. It
takes take a few years to successfully grow a seed into a tree that you can sculpt,
and the growth is part of the process. [INSERT LINK to read more on our
“premade bonsai page”}. In the meantime, you can make sure that your
fundamental knowledge of the art is solid. Learn more about growing and
nurturing a bonsai here. [insert LINK)

Whether you choose to grow an indoor or outdoor bonsai, and whether you
start with a premade bonsai scape, a starter tree, or to grow a tree from seed,
there is so much you can learn and gain from caring for a bonsai.