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bonsai tree care

Bonsai General Info, Bonsai Tree Care Basics

How Fast Do Bonsai Trees Grow?

how fast do bonsai trees grow

Whether you are interested in overseeing the growth of a new bonsai tree right from its seed form, or from one that is already grown, then you will have to be conversant with the growth period of the bonsai tree. Normally, a period of between 10-15 years is sufficient for the growth of a bonsai tree, taking into consideration all the different conditions involved.

In the fourth year of growth, your bonsai tree will be ready for styling and wiring. All bonsai trees are perceived as being ornamental, hence they do not grow to achieve the height that all other common trees achieve.

Do Bonsai trees grow as fast as normal trees?


Bonsai trees are genetically similar to the full-size tree species regardless of the popular beliefs spread about them. Due to this fact, normally the time taken by a bonsai tree to grow either exceeds that of normal trees or either way goes way below them. For most tree species, the slow growers take roughly between 20 and 30 years, while the fast-growing trees take anywhere between 20 and 30 years. As highlighted earlier, most bonsai trees take anywhere between 10 and 15 years to fully mature.

Some of the main reasons that contribute to the faster growth of bonsai trees include:

  • Bonsai trees are offered continuous care right from the preliminary stages of growth.
  • They usually receive regular and uniform pruning.
  • They usually have the perfect growing conditions that are not available for the other trees.

Bonsai trees usually receive more care and attention in comparison to other trees out in nature and this directly contributes to their rapid growth. A study conducted on trees revealed that bonsai trees live up to 25% longer than counterparts that are situated in their natural habitats.

How do the growing conditions of bonsai trees affect the growth process?


Providing the perfect growing conditions for bonsai trees does not only ensure that they grow healthy but also ensures that they grow fast. Bonsai trees grow under a carefully selected range of optimum conditions since the provision of care to them is of great importance.

Here are some of the conditions that affect their growth process:

Sunlight for bonsai trees

An appropriate wavelength of light intensity is needed for the growth of the bonsai trees. This implies that it neither should be too high nor too low: it should be optimum. The appropriate light intensity is key in the growth, survival as well as good health of the tree.

Water for bonsai trees

Water is life. It remains undisputed that no tree species can grow without water as water takes the most important role in the growth and life sustenance. Watering the bonsai trees should be done with such a high precision since over-watering and under-watering have been known to
pose great harm to the trees. The trees either retard in growth or simply die in other cases.

Nutrients for bonsai trees


Nutrients are responsible for buffering fast and robust growth in any tree species. Providing bonsai trees with high-quality nutrients decreases their growing period. Nutrition in bonsai trees is achieved by regular fertilizing of bonsai trees with the balanced bonsai feed during the growth period. During winter, low-nitrogen fertilizers are recommended.

Pruning bonsai trees

Pruning is known to open up the tree and remove any microclimates that are unfavorable for the tree. Bonsai trees should be pruned regularly and checked for diseases, pests and root rot which either way deteriorates the health of the tree. Pruning and disease control remains the surest way in which bonsai trees achieve their full sizes with ease.

Planting bonsai trees in the right environment


Growing a bonsai tree in the wrong environment can have a negative impact on the general outcome of the growth process. Bonsai trees should be grown under conditions that match those in the natural setting. The failure to consider this may lead to the bonsai tree not developing to resemble the tiny version of the original species.

The Fastest growing Bonsai Species


When it comes to selecting the bonsai tree species that grows fastest, then the Ficus Religious remains the best option. The species not only guarantees fast growth but also a robust one.

Bonsai growing too slow?

At some point, those interested in a bonsai tree business may find the growing period of the trees to be too long: between 20-30 years. The use of nursery stock trees remains the fastest way to create your bonsai though unfortunately, this remains the most underrated way. When using nursery stock trees, you only need to have a nursery tree that is roughly 4 years of age, so that you can prune it, style it, repot it for it to become a bonsai tree.

Another viable approach is to rely on cuttings to grow the bonsai trees since cuttings take a short time to adapt and start growing in comparison to seeds.

Growing bonsai trees is one of the best experiences that you create for yourself, either for leisure or as a business. They only call for patience during the entire growth process you can rest assured that upon maturing, they provide you with a spectacle that is so breathtaking and an impressive reward to all your efforts.

Bonsai Tree Care Basics, Uncategorized

How Hard Is It To Grow A Bonsai Tree?

When you are new to the world of horticulture, you are probably amazed at just how fascinating this pastime can be. There are so many different varieties of plants and trees that it could take several lifetimes just to get through it all.

One particularly fascinating example would be the Bonsai Tree. First of all, the Bonsai tree doesn’t refer to just a plant, but this is an art form that has been cultivated for several centuries. The main purpose of the Bonsai is to create a miniaturized tree that is cultivated to grow in a small container and is designed to appear like a much larger tree.

Bonsai trees were originally called dwarf potted trees, and this is a tradition that dates back to a thousand years or more. Indeed, the earliest known reference to a Bonsai creation was in a Medieval art scroll from the year 1195. If you are interested in this discipline, then there is a lot you need to know about it.

Keep these considerations in mind:

There are many different types of Bonsai trees and they have several different scientific names. Examples such as the Ginseng Ficus, Oriental Ficus, Brush Cherry, Chinese Elm, Norfolk Island and a multitude of others all indicate an endless amount of choices for you to consider. When it comes to scientific names, Bonsai families such as the Vervain family, the Bromeliad family, the Cedar, the “prunus” variety, and the “Succulents”
variety and many others are all categories that have been delineated by scientists.

Appropriately caring for Bonsai trees is a must. One of the things that you will quickly learn is that the Bonsai can be a very delicate plant! However, as long as you know the basics, you will be able to properly maintain the plant and keep it healthy for as long as possible. Here are some things you need to know:

Watering Your Bonsai

There are many factors that go into watering your Bonsai tree appropriately. The first thing you should do as a beginner is to thoroughly observe each of your trees INDIVIDUALLY before you water them. Avoid watering your Bonsai trees at a set routine. Instead, you should only water your Bonsai trees when you notice their soil has a slight dryness to them. Additionally, you should incorporate a soil mixture that holds in more water and use a watering tool that consists of a fine nozzle.

Fertilizing Your Bonsai

When fertilizing your Bonsai tree, it’s all about Nitrogen! The quantity depends on the season and there is a rating that you will need to pay attention to. Generally, a high NPK rating of 10:6:6 should be utilized in the spring, a balanced NPK rating of 6:6:6 should be considered in summer, and a lower NPK rating of 3:6:6 should be used in the fall. Of course, these guidelines only apply to outside Bonsai trees. An inside example will generally only required the balanced NPK fertilizer, but it will be used year-round. Many Bonsai enthusiasts swear by the Biogold brand for their fertilizer.

Pruning Your Bonsai

When it comes to pruning, you must keep the following goals in mind: you want to ensure that your tree always emulates a fully-grown and lifesize version and you want your Bonsai to be healthy and have as much eye appeal as possible. Usually, the best time to prune your Bonsai tree is when it is showing signs of new growth. This is the perfect time to begin styling your bonsai.

Wiring Your Bonsai

Bonsai tree enthusiasts use the wiring method to reposition the branches. This practice can be done on a year-round basis for Bonsai tree species. You can use either annealed copper wire or aluminum wire. You can easily find bonsai wiring supplies on amazon.

Repotting Your Bonsai Tree.

Repotting is important in order to keep your Bonsai growing correctly. Of course, this all begs the question, how frequently do you have to repot your plant? It depends on the size of the pot and the species of the tree. Species that are younger have a tendency to grow faster, thus they will need to be repotted often even once a year. A good rule of thumb is to simply check and see how the roots of the tree are holding up. If they are starting to wrap around the soil, it is time to repBonsai ot your tree.

Bonsai Pests

Finally, there are pests we have to contend with. Aphids are the biggest problem as they can eat away at the underside of the tree. However, simply spraying them off with a hose or placing lacewing larvae will remove all of these aphids.

Keeping all of this information in mind is sure to help you have a Bonsai tree that lives and prospers for a long time.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai Tree Care Basics

Your First Bonsai Tree: A Few Things To Consider


Starting your first bonsai tree is the first step of a satisfying process for a beginning grower.
The amount of effort you can put into growing your bonsai, whether you will grow it inside or
outdoors, and the maturity of your first tree are three important things you will want to
consider as you plan to cultivate your first tree.

  1. How much effort do you want to put in?
    Think about how much time you have to spend on the basic care of your growing plant. You
    will want to allow sufficient time for mindful and frequent observation of your tree. Keeping
    a bonsai healthy means keeping an eye on a few key things.
    Since the tree grows in a shallow dish, the soil can dry out fast. You will need to monitor
    the soil regularly to maintain proper moisture.
    As you get to know your bonsai, you’ll need to monitor its health. Through close and
    careful observation of the tree, you’ll learn to spot any scars or blemishes on the skin that
    require your attention. You will need to spend time making careful corrective actions, such
    as repositioning branches or wire.
    As a beginner, you’ll be eager to spend more time on the process as you watch your bonsai
    respond to your care, so make sure you allow for plenty.
  2. Will you be growing Indoor or outdoor bonsai?
    Are you going to grow an indoor or outdoor bonsai? Knowing the true difference between
    the two is helpful, as many people have a misconception as to what the terms really mean.
    Indoor trees.
    Typically, an indoor bonsai means a more tropical species that will likely require certain
    adjustments to the environment in order to do well. You’ll want to consider this when it
    comes to selecting the right indoor plant for you. Tropical bonsai need intense light for
    a significant number of hours each day, so where you place the container is an
    important factor. A bright spot near a southward-facing spot is ideal. But even in areas
    with a sunny, southern exposure, artificial light is often needed to bring the intensity up
    to sufficient levels for bonsai to thrive. It probably goes without saying that tropical
    plants need warmer temperatures, as well, so adjusting heating conditions will be
    essential.
    {INSERT PICTURES OF EXAMPLES on Amazon}
    Ficus, Jade and Fukien Tea trees are a few examples of popular indoor bonsai, but there
    are many more.

Learn more about indoor bonsai trees [INSERT LINK to read more on our “indoor bonsai
page”}.

Outdoor trees:
Temperate trees that go through a yearly growth cycle and require a dormancy period in
order to prepare for those cycles are outdoor trees. Be sure to consider the conditions
where you live in order to choose a bonsai that can thrive in that particular environment.
Certain varieties have sensitivities to intense heat or light; others shouldn’t be subjected to
frost conditions. Be sure to read up and understand what outdoor bonsai will do best in the
climate where you live.
Some examples of outdoor bonsai include gardenia, Chinese elm and dawn redwood. Learn
more about outside bonsai here. [INSERT LINK to read more on our “outdoor bonsai
page”}.

{Insert pictures and examples at Amazon}

  1. What are you going to start with?
    Now that you know what type of bonsai you wish to grow, you can choose the form or level
    and maturity level of the beginner tree that you are going to work with. Think about the
    level of effort you are going to dedicate to the process as you decide. There are a handful
    of options for starting a bonsai – three to be exact.
     You might begin with a pre-made bonsai scape
    A pre-made bonsai scape is a pre-potted tree in a container-garden environment, such
    as you might find in a nursery or flower shop. The plant is already aesthetically arranged
    in the pot and soil mediums in which it is intended to initially live. The shaping process
    has already been started and the tree has already been partially trained. As the new
    owner, you will take over this process, continuing to shape and direct the bonsai as it
    matures.
    Your pre-made bonsai scape will continue to develop as you continue to sculpt and care
    for it. There may be an advantage to working with a tree that is already accustomed to
    being pruned and tied. But a new bonsai gardener might want the learning experience
    of participating in the training process. Keep that in mind when choosing your starter
    material.

Learn more about pre-made bonsai scapes here [INSERT LINK to read more on our “pre-
made bonsai scapes page”}.
{INSERT examples with pics and links to them on amazon)

 Another starter option is a pre-bonsai tree
Pre-bonsai is a young tree that’s already growing and ready to train. Part of your job
will be to give this young tree a new home, in an appropriate shallow container and soil
medium. As its first and primary trainer, your care and devotion is critical to the
development of the young tree, as well as to the development of your skill and ability as
a bonsai grower. Click {insert link to “pre made bonsai scape page} to learn more about
growing prebonsai.
Make sure you have the proper materials and techniques for sculpting and positioning
your plant, which will involve three basic things: pruning, wiring and repotting. Click the
links to learn more about caring for your bonsai. [LINKS]

[insert three examples and links on Amazon]

 Your third starter option is to begin your bonsai tree from seed.
Growing a tree from seed to shoot to a tree that is ready to form and train as
bonsai is a longer and more involved process than the previous options that are
mentioned. As a beginner, this is where the learning curve will be at its greatest,
as the steps involved in raising a tree from a seed require a greater length of
time and know-how. All of this must occur before getting to the process of
sculpting the actual tree. Study up on the process before getting started. You
can learn more here trees [INSERT LINK to read more on our “pre bonsai scape
page”}.
As you know, bonsai is a process and a journey, rather than a destination. It
takes take a few years to successfully grow a seed into a tree that you can sculpt,
and the growth is part of the process. [INSERT LINK to read more on our
“premade bonsai page”}. In the meantime, you can make sure that your
fundamental knowledge of the art is solid. Learn more about growing and
nurturing a bonsai here. [insert LINK)

Whether you choose to grow an indoor or outdoor bonsai, and whether you
start with a premade bonsai scape, a starter tree, or to grow a tree from seed,
there is so much you can learn and gain from caring for a bonsai.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai Tree Care Basics, Indoor Bonsai Trees, Uncategorized

Can You Keep A Bonsai Tree Indoors?

While it is true that you can keep bonsai trees indoor, this is only true for certain trees. Before placing your tree indoors, you should first figure out what tree you have. Tropical and subtropical trees are the only ones that can thrive indoors. These trees need high, stable temperatures all year round. This can be achieved outdoors only in certain climates.

Indoor vs Outdoor trees

As mentioned before, indoor bonsai trees need high, stable temperatures consistently all year. Outdoor bonsai trees, on the other hand, need to be exposed to the changing of the seasons. Outdoor trees experience dormancy periods in the winter and another small one in the summer, indoor trees do not. This dormancy period is completely natural in outdoor trees, but very unnatural and unnecessary for indoor species. If outdoor species do not receive this dormancy period, they will grow weak and can die. 

Caring for an Indoor Bonsai Tree

Taking care of bonsai trees is different from caring for a regular potted plant. Bonsai trees are planted in shallow containers in order to limit their nutrients and water intake. Indoor bonsai trees are also used to lots of light and high humidity, which can be hard to emulate in your household. 

Light

Light is one of the most important factors in caring for a bonsai. These trees need lots of light with as much light intensity as possible all year long. This can be hard to accomplish indoors, but it can be done. Placing your tree directly in front of a South facing window will ensure the tree will get as much natural light as possible. That being said, it is still very possible that your tree still isn’t getting enough light. Adding artificial lighting for around 10 hours a day will help significantly. 

Humidity and Temperature

Indoor bonsai also need high humidity all year round. Your tree needs higher humidity levels than the ones in your household, especially when using air conditioning and heating. Circulating air from outside by opening a window during the daytime will help. To increase humidity, you can try placing a humidity tray filled with water underneath the tree’s pot. Be careful not to let the tree’s roots soak in the water, though, as this will cause the roots to rot.

Tropical trees also need high temperatures all year, close to the temperatures in your living room. Subtropical trees, on the other hand, thrive in a low temperature winter. These trees like temperatures lower than your average living room.

Watering and Fertilizing 

Another very important part of caring for a bonsai is watering. How much water a bonsai tree needs varies from tree to tree, but there are some general guidelines you can follow for every tree. The first being that you should never water a bonsai tree on a routine or schedule. Check the soil’s moisture levels every day or a few times a day in the hotter months. You can check the soil using your finger, a chopstick, or a moisture meter. If the soil is dry, water generously until the water starts dripping out of the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot. Then repeat this process once more. Do not water your plant when the soil is already wet. This can cause root rot and will eventually kill the plant if left untreated.

All bonsai fertilizers contain the elements Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), and Potassium (K). Each element serves its own purpose. For indoor bonsai trees, balanced fertilizer should be applied consistently all year round because they lack a growth period. The packaging should tell you how often to apply the fertilizer.

Caring for indoor bonsai trees isn’t as hard as one may think. So long as you care for your tree properly, your tree should grow healthy and strong. The tree should receive as much light as possible during the day. Constant high humidity is required all year round, and temperatures should stay relatively high for tropical trees, lower for subtropical. Water your tree when it needs to be water, never on a routine. Fertilize constantly all year round. In time, you will learn your tree and will be able to care for it much easier.