Bonsai Care, Bonsai Species, Indoor Bonsai Trees

How To Take Care Of Pine Trees Indoors

One of the most popular bonsai trees is pine. Many people prefer using pine trees as bonsai since they are coniferous and evergreen. The great thing about pine is that you get to shape them however you want.

However, before we start discussing how to take care of pine bonsai indoors, you need to understand a few details. Different pine species are categorized depending on whether they produce one or two growth flushes.

If your pine tree species has two growth flushes, then it can be decandled during early spring. Doing this ensures that your pine will produce a second flush by the start of early summer. However, if your pine produces a single growth flush, then it should not be decandled. You only need to shorten and select candles in such a case.

Positioning Pine Bonsai 

Although pine trees are quite hardy, they need lots of light for proper development. Adequate light will support the healthy growth of your pine. Without proper sunlight, your pine will have more extended needle sizes.

During winter, you may need to install a bonsai lighting system in your home. Since your pine is placed inside a container, it needs to be protected during the winter. Place your pine bonsai next to a large window to ensure that it gets sufficient sunlight.

Watering Your Pine Bonsai

With pine bonsai, you need to ensure that you carry out proper watering. Bonsai pines don’t like an environment with permanent moisture. Having an adequate drainage system will ensure that you don’t over-water your bonsai.

The biggest downside of overwatering is that it will lead to rotting of the roots. One of the most important parts of bonsai cultivation is healthy roots. Rotting roots in pine bonsai can be fatal when not properly handled.

Create a watering schedule to help you keep track of your bonsai’s water needs. Under-watering could also lead to several problems.

Fertilizing Your Pine Bonsai

Healthy pine bonsai need to be fertilized from the start of early spring to the end of autumn. However, weak pine trees have to be fertilized all year round. Only stop fertilizing the weak trees when the temperature drops.

Solid organic fertilizer needs to be applied at 4-week intervals before decandling can be carried out. You will need to stop fertilization once the secondary candle growth starts to harden. Begin the fertilization process in late autumn.

Training Your Pine Bonsai

Training your pine bonsai needs to be done during the early autumn or spring. Using wires for training is pretty straightforward, and you get to shape your pine however you want. Ensure that you conduct training carefully over a set period.

Do not overstrain your pine bonsai during training. Give your pine enough room to recover during the entire process. Training will strain your pine bonsai, which means that you need to be careful. Repotting, on the other side, needs to be done in spring when you notice the buds starting to swell.

Common Pine Bonsai Pests and Diseases

Pines get infected by spider mites, aphids, and caterpillars quite often. Other times, your pine bonsai may be attacked by root rot and fungal diseases. To treat the common pests and diseases that affect pine bonsai, you need to use specific pesticides.

In such situations, seek help from an expert in the field. Pines can deteriorate quickly when exposed to pests and diseases. However, pines tend to be healthy when adequately taken care of.

Conclusion

Pine is, undoubtedly, getting quite popular among many beginners in bonsai cultivators. The beauty of pine bonsai is that you get to create different shapes depending on your desires. However, proper care of your pine bonsai is essential since you are investing a lot of time and effort into the project.

Remember to start by identifying the pine species that you have before carrying out the above practices. Bonsai cultivation requires a lot of patience. It will take a while before you start noticing changes.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai Species, Indoor Bonsai Trees

How to Bonsai an Oak Sapling

Oak trees are not the most popular bonsai species. Although oak trees are abundant in Japan, these majestic trees have not yet gained popularity. This is mainly due to the broad leaves that are not suitable when it comes to the art of miniature tree cultivation.

However, if you are thinking of creating a bonsai from an oak sapling, then you have come to the right place. It isn’t as simple as you might think, and you will need to exercise a lot of care. The good news is that the journey is rewarding, making it worth the time and effort.

Growing An Oak Bonsai from Seed Versus Buying a Grown Tree

Not all oak trees make good bonsai due to the occurrence of broad leaves, as stated earlier on. Growing an oak bonsai from seed can, therefore, be quite tricky, since you might not know whether the tree will make a good bonsai or not.

The advantage of using a grown tree is that you get to choose the characteristics that you want. Your bonsai will have similar characteristics to the donor plant. This ensures that you can look for all the traits that you might need in an oak bonsai.

Growing from seed will require cultivation over an extended period. Yes, you might want to start from scratch, but this needs a lot of patience. Growing from seed will take about three or four years more than buying a grown tree.

How to Grow Oak Bonsai From Seed

Growing an oak bonsai from seed can be rather tricky. You will need to plant several seeds and wait patiently for the seedling to emerge. This will take quite a while, making it impractical in many cases. You will then have to choose a healthy seedling to start designing your oak bonsai.

Using oak sapling is the preferred way, according to several experts. In this article, we will focus on using an oak sapling rather than a seed.

How to Grow Oak Bonsai From a Tree

It would help if you started by choosing a wild sapling that is well-rooted and between 6 inches to 12 feet tall. Pick a sapling with the main leader that can bend appropriately without breaking. Then it would help if you started creating your bonsai soil.

Mix peat moss and perlite in an equal ratio to get you the perfect bonsai growing medium. Proceed to repot your tree into a container using your soil.

Use small pruning shears to prune all the vigorous shoots that emerge on the upper tree level. You could always use scissors when you want to achieve precision. Leave all the fragile shoots in place.

Your oak bonsai should start taking shape as a miniature tree without losing its balance. Ensure that you encourage thin growth at the top and thick growth at the bottom.

Use scissors to clip all the leaves apart from those at the end of your branches. This will encourage your tree to bud out close to the trunk. Use aluminum wire to train the leader and branch while leaving a space of about a quarter-inch between the coils. You can then proceed to bend your oak bonsai to whatever shape you need. However, exercise a lot of caution because you don’t want to damage the bark while training.

Prune your branches during the late fall when your bonsai goes into dormancy. Always cut the end nodes on higher branches to encourage growth at the bottom.

Caring for Your Oak After Planting  

Caring for your oak after planting is a simple task once you understand the basic guidelines. Fertilization, watering, and positioning are vital when caring for your oak tree. You need to ensure that you provide adequate water and fertilizer to your bonsai.

Proper position is also vital, especially when you plan on growing your bonsai indoors. You need to ensure that your oak bonsai gets sufficient sunlight and humidity throughout the year.

Conclusion

To effectively bonsai an oak sapling, you need a lot of patience. Proper care is equally important, especially during the early stages. This extensive guide should help you on your transformative journey in bonsai cultivation.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai Species, Bonsai Tree Care Basics, Flowing Bonsai Trees, Fruiting Bonsai Trees

How to Grow Cherry Blossom Bonsai

Few plants are as beautiful as the cherry blossom bonsai. This plant has existed since ancient times. Japan is the primary host of these plants since they are popularly grown there. Cherry blossom bonsai are also grown all over the world, so you need not reside in Japan to enjoy all this beauty. If you want to know more about the cherry blossom bonsai, keep reading this article.

How to Grow Cherry Blossom Bonsai from Seeds

If you want to grow cherry blossom bonsai, it is better to use seeds. However, this will result in a longer period of tree development. Ensure that you choose the appropriate type of tree. Note that the kind of tree you choose plays a vital role in planting from scratch. Most trees take approximately 4-5 years to develop a tree trunk of 1 inch with a diameter of 25cm. Therefore, it is appropriate that you make a wise decision regarding choosing the type of tree. For example, statistics show that the Citrus variety does not deliver remarkable performance in Toronto; thus, if you are a Toronto resident, you should avoid choosing Citrus.

It is essential to consider the climate at your home. This is possible if you check the type of trees grown at your residence. You can also opt to purchase online, but remember to go through customer reviews to select the best. 

When you obtain seeds, go ahead and create a standard layer of bonsai soil. After this, place the seeds in the soil, ensuring that there is space between the seeds. Note that this is a long process.

How to Grow Cherry Blossom Bonsai from Cuttings

There are only two ways for you to grow cherries: seeds or cuttings. However, growing cherries from cuttings is the easiest way to go. So, how do you grow cherry blossom bonsai from cuttings?

Before growing cherries using cuttings, you must note that there are two types of cherry blossom bonsai. These are:

Sweet cherries (Prunus avium)

Tart (Prunus Cerasus)

This is the stone fruit family. In this case, to get a duplicate of your tree, you need to grow it from a cherry cutting. You must note that sweet and tart cherries’ transmission is through hardwood as well as semi-hardwood cuttings. During the summer season, try to get semi-hardwood cuttings, especially when the wood is not mature enough and soft. On the other hand, you can get hardwood cuttings in dormant seasons, where the wood is mature and hard.

When you have acquired the plant, make sure you fill your plastic pot of 6 inches with clay, mixing it with ½ sphagnum peat moss as well as perlite. Choose a cherry branch with leaves and about 2 to 4 leaf nodes. It should be below the age of 5 years. Cuttings that you make from old trees should be from young branches that have just developed. During this process, use a sterile and sharp pruning shear to cut 10-20cm from a horizontal angle. After this process, dip the end of your cutting in a hormone for rooting. Use your finger to make a hole, put the end of your cutting into the hole and cover it up. Put a plastic bag over the container. Ensure that the container gets sufficient sun with an appropriate temperature. Moreover, keep the soil moist by using a spray bottle twice a day.

After 2-3 months, remove the plastic bag from your container and examine your cutting if it has developed roots. If there is any resistance, repeat the entire process until the roots fill the whole container. When the roots develop fully, transfer your cutting to a gallon container full of soil. Expose the cherry tree to outdoor sunlight and temperature before you do the transplanting to ensure proper germination. Carefully select your area of transplanting. Dig your hole twice the tree size but not deeper. Remove it from your container and make sure you support the trunk using your single hand. Fill the gap with sufficient soil and water it to do away with air pockets around the root balls, and fill it until you cannot see the roots anymore. Moreover, make sure you level the soil to the ground level.

How to Care for Cherry Blossom Bonsai

  • Repotting Your Cherry Blossom Bonsai

After 2 to 3 years, repot your cherry blossom bonsai. You can achieve repotting in late winter when your plant is not flowering. Repotting allows your plant to develop compact, strong roots.

  • Sunlight Needed for Your Cherry Blossom Bonsai

Cherries require maximum sunlight with reduced wind. During winter, it is appropriate that it goes dormant for three months. Additionally, it should also be kept fresh without frost. Place it in a garage to protect it from frost.

  • Fertilizing Your Cherry Blossom Bonsai

Make sure you fertilize your tree each month once using an organic or liquid fertilizer. You can achieve this efficiently during the period of development. However, do not attempt it during winter when your plant is dormant.

  • Watering Your Cherry Blossom Bonsai

Watering is necessary for any plant. Ensure that your plant gets sufficient water. If you grow your plant where there is direct sunlight, water it well, until water leaks out of the pot.

Conclusion

Based on the above information on how to grow Cherry Blossom Bonsai, you now have a clear understanding of how to plant using seed and cutting. Furthermore, you also know how to care for and maintain the tree. I hope that this information will be of benefit to you in learning how to grow cherry blossom bonsai.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai General Info, Bonsai Tree Care Basics

How Long Do Bonsai Trees Live For?

Most people have asked this question, since bonsai trees are not easy to look after. Some bonsai trees live for 100 years. Furthermore, the oldest bonsai tree is over 1000 years old! Your tree can only leave this long if you provide continuous maintenance and care. These trees live longer compared to similar species in nature. Therefore, this article will inform you how long your bonsai tree can live.

Top 4 Oldest Bonsai

Some of the oldest bonsai worldwide are over 800 years old, which is a result of hard work and a lot of patience. Below are the four oldest bonsai on record:

Japanese White Pine

This bonsai has survived for approximately 400 years. This has been achieved due to generations of patience and hard work by the Yamaki family. It is unique since it managed to survive in Hiroshima during the calamity of an atomic bomb in 1945. Its survival led it to be donated to Penjing and National Bonsai Museum located in Washington.

800-year-old Bonsai at Shunkaen

This is one of the costliest bonsai trees. Moreover, it is a perfect tree that is popular due to its maximum age of 800. Kunio Kobayashi is the bonsai’s primary artist; this artist is famous and has managed to win the prestigious Prime Minister award four times in Japan.

Old juniper Bonsai Tree

This tree is located at Mansei-en, Japan; it has been proven to be 1000 years old. Furthermore, it has maintained its sturdy material; if you want to see it, you can visit the Mansei-en Bonsai Kato family nursery in Japan.

Ficus Bonsai Tree

Ficus Bonsai is one of the oldest trees worldwide, living for more than 1000 years. It is the primary tree displayed at the Italian Bonsai Museum at Crespi.

Bonsai Species that Live the Longest

Any plant has the potential to be a bonsai. Therefore, whenever you select a plant for longevity, it is ideal to choose a variety with sufficient strength and adaptability. This means you can choose from either evergreen or deciduous species. Your basic skills play a vital role when it comes to growing a bonsai tree. For evergreen species, opt for cedar, cypress, Azalea, Fig, Holly, Pomegranate and pine, while for deciduous species, you can select cherry, beech or maple. When you opt for this species, you will get a beautiful bonsai plant with an extended lifespan.

The Importance of Care for Longevity

Did you know that any species of a tree can be shaped to become a bonsai? The answer is yes; you can achieve this perfect shape if you implement discipline as well as excellent skills in your work. You will not have a bonsai tree if you plant your tree in a container and develop with just pruning; it will not result in a bonsai tree. Ensure that you trim and prune each twig, root and branch continuously to achieve a perfect shape of a bonsai tree.

Bonsai trees require proper care and maintenance for them to have a longer lifespan. The environment is an essential key to a healthy bonsai. Different varieties of trees will succeed either indoors or outdoors. It is also vital to note that outdoor species become dormant during the winter.

Outdoor species are likely not to survive if put indoors for a long duration. During the summer season, keep your outdoor bonsai indoors for approximately a week. Preserve your indoor bonsai under the temperature of 50 to 80 degrees. Make sure you do not expose them to extreme cold, as they might die.

Another consideration is the watering of your bonsai tree. This is an essential factor. You should closely monitor your soil moisture to ensure that it receives a sufficient amount of water to grow appropriately. During summer, you will be forced to water it more frequently compared to rainy seasons.

Potting is necessary when it comes to a bonsai’s proper growth. Most bonsai artists usually come up with their own soil mix or opt for a potting mix. On the other hand, there are many varieties of bonsai soil mixes. However, the only variation between potting soil mixes and the bonsai mix is the minimal fertilizer quantity. Fertilizer plays a crucial role in the growth of healthy plants. For proper growth of your bonsai tree, potassium, phosphorus, and nitrogen are necessary.

How to Prune to Extend Bonsai Lifespan

Every plant has a regular cycle for growing; this applies to the bonsai tree too. The stunted appearance of the bonsai tree does not mean it lacks the potential to grow. Therefore, if you prune your bonsai tree appropriately, you will keep it healthy and extend its lifespan. A bonsai tree can respond well to pruning if it is appropriately trimmed. Ideally, you prune developing growth during winter and old-growth in the fall season. For trees such as cedar and pine, use your fingers for pruning through a twisting motion to maintain a natural impression. Prune diseased branches and leaves to maximize your tree’s health. When you are through, make sure that you examine which branches are responding more effectively than others. This will encourage the growth of healthy leaves.

Conclusion

Based on the above information, you are now familiar with how long bonsai trees can live. Therefore, you can choose a species that is likely to have an extended lifespan. I hope this article helped you to understand how long bonsai trees live.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai Species, Flowing Bonsai Trees

How To Care For Crepe Myrtle Bonsai Tree

Being native to the subtropical regions of Australia and Asia, the Crepe Myrtle has beautiful white, pink, and purple flowers. Many bonsai cultivators are captivated by both the flowers and bark of this deciduous tree.

In autumn, the leaves of the Crepe Myrtle turn orange-red and yellow in a beautiful display. Since this tree can endure strenuous weather conditions, it is an excellent choice for beginners in Bonsai. However, taking care of Crepe Myrtle is not as easy as it seems. In this article, we will take an in-depth look at how to care for the Crepe Myrtle bonsai tree.

Where to Position Your Crepe Myrtle Bonsai

It will help if you position your tree in a spot with exposure to full sunlight. The position is essential because the sun helps prevent insect attacks and fungal diseases while encouraging flowering. If you live in a warm climate, you can place your Crepe Myrtle outside all year round. However, ensure that you transfer your Bonsai to a cool place if you live in a temperate climate.

Watering Your Crepe Myrtle Bonsai

Your Crepe Myrtle should never dry out, especially during the growth period. You should water your Bonsai adequately throughout the year. However, reduce watering during the winter period due to dormancy.

One common mistake that beginners in bonsai cultivation make is overwatering. Your Bonsai needs sufficient water; however, overwatering can be fatal. Only water your Crepe Myrtle bonsai when you notice the soil starting to dry up.

Fertilizing Your Crepe Myrtle Bonsai

During the growing season, ensure that you fertilize your Bonsai every two weeks. Understand that liquid fertilizer is best for your Crepe Myrtle bonsai tree. You can add solid organic fertilizer once your Bonsai matures.

Training Your Crepe Myrtle Bonsai

Only prune your Crepe Myrtle bonsai tree at the end of summer. Doing this will encourage the production of buds during the next year. Wiring is vital when it comes to training any bonsai tree. With the Crepe Myrtle, conduct wiring carefully so that you don’t damage the beautiful bark.

Start by wrapping tape or paper around your wire before you start training. You should also remove the wire around the branches in time to avoid any damages. Use guy-wires wherever possible.

Common Crepe Myrtle Diseases and Pests

Aphids can be a huge bother to your Crepe Myrtle bonsai tree. You can wash the insects off your tree with a strong water jet. However, in severe cases, you will need to use a specific insecticide for better results.

Mildew is also a common problem when it comes to the Crepe Myrtle bonsai tree. Get the specific fungicide that you need when dealing with this situation. Understand that your Bonsai could be affected by other pests and diseases as well. Conduct regular checks on your bonsai tree to spot early signs of pests or diseases.

Repotting Your Crepe Myrtle Bonsai

Your Crepe Myrtle needs to be repotted every two to three years to promote healthy growth. Repotting is crucial in ensuring that your Bonsai gets all the nutrients that it needs. With time, your soil mix begins to lose both its nutrients and water retention properties.

Introduce organic fertilizer to your soil mix when carrying out repotting. Your Bonsai needs the right soil mix to promote healthy growth. Be careful during repotting to ensure that you don’t damage the root system of your Bonsai.

Propagating Your Crepe Myrtle Bonsai

Propagating Crepe Myrtle can be done through cuttings or seeds. However, most people prefer cuttings because you get to save up on a lot of time. With seed propagation, it takes a lot of time to get a healthy seedling to turn into Bonsai.

Conclusion

Taking care of the Crepe Myrtle bonsai tree requires a lot of time and patience. However, the result is usually worth the effort. Understand that there is a little bit of a learning curve when it comes to bonsai cultivation. It will, therefore, take you some time and practice before you get that perfect bonsai tree.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai General Info, Bonsai Tree Care Basics

Bonsai Tree Brown Leaves

Over the years, bonsai cultivation has become quite popular, with more beginners venturing into the art every day. Although these miniature trees make excellent indoor decorations, they can be quite challenging to care for. Bonsai trees need the same nutrients and environmental factors as larger trees.

Without proper care, bonsai leaves start to turn brown or wilt. Once you notice brown leaves, you need to pay close attention to your miniature tree. Most of the time, your bonsai tree will die if you don’t get to the bottom of the problem.

There are many reasons why the leaves or stem of your bonsai tree may be turning brown. In the next section, we will take an extensive look at the common reasons why your bonsai may have brown leaves. We will also take you through the options for remedying the situation.

Improper Watering Causing Browning Leaves on Bonsai

To survive, your bonsai needs a specific amount of water. Underwatering will lead to the browning of leaves, and eventually, the trunk will start wilting. Overwatering, on the other hand, will lead to root rot and thus browning of leaves.

bonsai watering

Most beginners make the mistake of overwatering since they are always checking up on their bonsai. Different tree species have different watering needs making it impossible to have a standard watering timetable.

A great example is when you start noticing the trunk part of your bonsai getting soft. This is usually an indication of overwatering, which causes the roots to rot. Reduce the watering frequency and let the soil dry up completely. Then start watering your bonsai only when needed.

Only water your bonsai when you notice the soil starting to dry up. Constant supervision should help you identify the specific water needs of your bonsai.

Insufficient Light Causing Browning Leaves on Bonsai

When bonsai trees are kept indoors, then they are hugely affected by a lack of sunlight. Your miniature tree could either be subtropical, hardy, or tropical. The sturdy tree varieties need a lot of direct sunlight, which means that the leaves will turn brown quite quickly when kept indoors.

The bonsai in the subtropical and tropical category can survive quite well in partial sunlight. As a rule of thumb, your bonsai needs at least six hours of direct sunlight every day. Identify a position in your room that receives several hours of direct sunlight.

Move your bonsai to the identified location and monitor for a few days. The leaves should start regaining their elegant color and shape. 

Diseases and Pests Causing Browning Leaves on Bonsai

When it comes to bonsai, pests and diseases can cause massive problems. Most of the time, pests can go unnoticed for several weeks and months. Your bonsai leaves will, therefore, turn brown before you notice that the entire tree is infested with pests.

Pests such as spider mites and aphids feed on the nutrients in your bonsai’s steam and leaves. Because the nutrients don’t reach their destination, the leaves gradually start turning brown. In such situations, remove all the dead and brown leaves before spraying a light pesticide.

Nutrient Problems Causing Browning Leaves on Bonsai

Your bonsai tree needs proper nutrients to develop and grow. Nutrient deficiency while leading to the browning of leaves quite quickly. Lack of magnesium, iron, and nitrogen are the common reasons why your bonsai leaves may turn brown.

The browning of stems and leaves simultaneously is a common sign of nutrient imbalance. It would help if you used the right fertilizer mixture to ensure that your bonsai gets a sufficient amount of nutrients. Carry out extensive research to figure out the exact nutrient requirement for your bonsai tree.

Fertilizing needs to be done all year round when you have a weak bonsai tree. However, the best times to fertilize a healthy bonsai are usually at the start of spring and end of summer.

Conclusion

The browning of your bonsai’s leaves can be caused by several factors, including watering schedule, nutrient issues, insufficient light, and more. Ensure that you diagnose the problem first before carrying out a remedy. With time, you will grow into a skilled bonsai cultivator that can identify the different issues quickly. The beauty of bonsai cultivation is the fact that you get to experiment and develop your skills.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai General Info, Bonsai Tree Care Basics

How Hard Are Bonsai Trees To Take Care Of?

Taking care of a bonsai tree seems like a lot of work. However, this is not entirely true once you understand the basic guidelines. Bonsai cultivation is a rewarding art form that simply requires you to master a few basics.

How hard are bonsai trees to take care of? This is quite a common question among many individuals who plan on venturing into the bonsai business. In this article, we will take an in-depth look at basic bonsai care guidelines.

The Easiest Bonsai to Care For

Bonsai trees are rather delicate when compared to other trees. Since bonsai trees are miniature versions of the regular trees, you need to handle them with care. The easiest bonsai to care for is the Ficus bonsai.

The Ficus tree can withstand a lot of harsh climates, including lack of sunlight and low humidity. The Ficus bonsai is, therefore, a great option when you are a beginner in bonsai cultivation.

However, don’t just limit yourself to the Ficus bonsai. Other easy bonsai to care for include Jade, Fukien Tea, Sweet Plum, and Hawaiian Umbrella. Pick tree species that can tolerate harsh conditions, because they tend to be more resilient.

The Hardest Bonsai to Care For

The Pine tree bonsai is considered among the hardest bonsai to care for, due to its growth pattern. Cultivating pine bonsai can be quite difficult because they are among the hardest tree species to turn into bonsai.

You will need to carefully study aspects such as growth patterns and appearances before you can successfully turn a pine tree into a bonsai. However, this doesn’t mean that beginners can’t do it. Sometimes all you need is a little determination and patience.

Bonsai Care Guidelines 

There are a few care guidelines that you need to follow when you decide to venture into bonsai cultivation. The most important aspects include fertilization, watering, and positioning. In this section, we will take an extensive look at the basic bonsai care guidelines.

1. Watering Your Bonsai

Watering is undoubtedly one of the most crucial aspects when it comes to bonsai cultivation. Every tree will have different watering needs depending on several factors. Some of these factors include tree size, pot size, tree species, time of year, climate, and soil mix.

However, you should only water your bonsai tree when it needs it. You need to ensure that the soil doesn’t dry out entirely while avoiding overwatering. Too much water will lead to root rot, so you have to be careful.

2. Fertilizing Your Bonsai

During the winter, you need to fertilize your bonsai tree quite regularly. Since your bonsai is placed in a small pot, it isn’t able to spread its roots in search of nutrients during the winter. Ensure that you fertilize your tree regularly to replenish the nutrient content in your soil.

3. Repotting Your Bonsai

Regular repotting is vital since you don’t want to starve your bonsai to death. To avoid making your tree pot-bound, you have to repot it every two to three years. Repotting is beneficial to your bonsai since the practice ensures that your tree always has sufficient nutrients. Bonsai trees, just like regular trees, need nutrients for growth.

4. Bonsai Soil

You must use the right bonsai soil mixture for your tree. Soil ensures that your bonsai has plenty of nutrients throughout the year. The soil has to drain appropriately while providing sufficient aeration and water retention. You could always purchase ready-made bonsai mix from the local stores. However, learning to create your soil mixture will save you a lot of money.

5. Location of Bonsai

It would help if you found a suitable position for your bonsai tree. Start by considering whether your bonsai is indoors or outdoors. You can then determine the best location for your bonsai to thrive. With indoor bonsai, you might have to get artificial lights, especially during winter.

Conclusion

Taking care of bonsai is not a difficult task once you get the basics right. Follow the above care guidelines to help you on your journey in bonsai cultivation. It might seem difficult at first, but you will find it easier as time goes by.

Bonsai General Info, Bonsai Species

How Big Can a Bonsai Tree Get?

Bonsai growing is an art form that incorporates both ancient tradition and beauty. According to several bonsai enthusiasts, the real art of bonsai is in its shape. When you are a beginner in bonsai cultivation, you are probably fascinated by the size and shape of these trees. However, it takes a lot of discipline and determination to create the perfect miniature tree. In this article, we will take a closer look at how big a bonsai tree can get.

Biggest Bonsai Trees

The biggest bonsai trees grow up to a height of around eighty inches in height. These bonsai are common in Japanese imperial gardens since they take years to cultivate. These bonsai trees can’t be moved by one person and instead need at least three people! However, note that this dimension is not set in stone, and you could always grow a taller bonsai tree if you wish.

Smallest Bonsai Trees

The smallest bonsai trees are commonly referred to as poppy seed-sized trees. They are considered an artfully designed seedling because they rarely get taller than three inches. You can lift these trees with two fingers. However, the smallest bonsai trees need a lot of care and attention. You should exercise a lot of caution when pruning and repotting the small bonsai trees.

Bonsai Size Classifications

The bonsai size classifications were originally based on how many hands you would need to move the miniature tree and pot. According to the ranking, these trees can either be one-handed, three-handed, two-handed and so on. The three primary bonsai size classifications are miniature, medium, and large.

Now, each of the classifications has subcategories with exact hand requirements and measurements. In this section, we will highlight these subcategories to help you get a better understanding of bonsai size classification. Note that these categories may not fit every bonsai out there.

Miniature Bonsai

1. Keshitsubo

The smallest bonsai trees are classified under this subcategory. It consists of tiny bonsai trees that can be lifted using two fingers. Ranging between 1 to 3 inches, the Keshitsubo tree makes a beautiful decorative element in any home.

2. Shito

Also referred to as the fingertip size, the Shito tree grows between 2 to 4 inches. In some areas, they are known as thimble bonsai since they are small enough to fit into pots the size of thimbles. There are several techniques incorporated in the creation of this miniature tree.

3. Mame

Growing between 3 to 6 inches, the Mame only requires a single hand to move around. Most of the time, this miniature tree has a larger pot than the Shito bonsai.

4. Komono

With a height of between 6 to 10 inches, the komono bonsai is the largest bonsai that you could move with a single hand. They are equally known as the small generic bonsai.

Medium Bonsai

1. Katade-mochi

This miniature tree has a height of between 10 to 18 inches, making it quite easy to handle. This is a popular size among many bonsai cultivators, especially beginners. Working with this medium bonsai is quite straightforward.

2. Chumono/Chiu

With time, Chiu and Chumono have become interchangeable since they are both considered two-handed trees. These bonsai have a height ranging between 16 to 36 inches.

Large Bonsai

1. Omono/dai

These are the smallest varieties in the large bonsai size category. Growing to a height of 30 to 48 inches, they require four hands to lift.

2. Hachi-Uye

The Hachi-Uye are generally large and need six hands to move. They can reach a height of between 40 to 60 inches making them quite fascinating.

3. Imperial

Considered the most majestic bonsai trees, the imperial bonsai has a height of 60 to 80 inches. You need eight hands to move these trees.

Conclusion

The size of a bonsai is dictated by the gardener: you! You can decide on the best size for you by considering factors such as care and pruning. Since training a bonsai can be rather challenging, you need to exercise a lot of patience and determination. The good news is that bonsai sizes are not set in stone, which means that you can always experiment.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai General Info, Bonsai Species, Bonsai Tree Care Basics, Indoor Bonsai Trees

Easiest Bonsai Tree To Care For

Bonsai care includes meeting specific needs that common plants do not have. For example, did you know that most bonsai trees are bred to be outdoor plants like their full-size counterparts? If you bring bonsai in the sun indoors, be prepared to give it about 14 hours a day of fluorescent light. However, some bonsai plants don’t need a lot of light, and these types can be perfect if you need to do bonsai care indoors. This article offers a list of the easiest bonsai trees for beginners to care for.

Ficus Bonsai

Ficus is one of the most popular types of indoor bonsai. There are over 800 varieties of ficus, but two specific kinds make good beginner bonsai trees. Ficus neriifolia is a willow-leaved fig known for its delusional leaves, hard root propagation, and twig shoots. Ficus benjamina is a rapidly evolving evergreen tree with rich foliage and roots. It can be best formed in a formal or informal straightening, or in the style of a weeping fig tree. It heals quickly and does not easily recover from massive pruning wounds, so it is better to plant these trees from smaller trees rather than taking cuttings from larger trees.

Ficus bonsai is famous for the milky sap that extends from slices or wounds. Some can also produce small flowers; however, these can only be inoculated by a specialized trace. These bonsai can have aerial roots, but to thrive in this way, they must be placed in approximately 100% humidity.

Chinese Elm Bonsai

Chinese elms are lovely indoor trees that are among the easiest trees for bonsai beginners. Their fast growth, small leaves, wooden stumps, and short knots make it very easy for beginners to grow a healthy and attractive bonsai, even inside the home or office. The Chinese elm is more tolerant of overwatering and underwatering than most types of bonsai. It responds well to cable training or can be prepared with directional pruning. It can grow in good or harsh soil, as long as you don’t let it sit in water or dry out completely. It is easy to grow from cuttings. If you have grown a whole Chinese elm in your neighborhood, you can germinate a bonsai productively from new seeds.

Japanese Maple Bonsai

It has particularly sensitive leaves and can easily burn due to sun exposure. Therefore, it would be good to expose it to moderate sunlight and shade it from exposure during midday and summer. Autumn and spring are good times for sun exposure because sunlight is mild, but winter should be a time of full protection from wind and cold. The Japanese maple bonsai is generally formed through careful and discriminating pruning. 

It is advisable to avoid pruning in the spring to avoid damaging the plant. You can schedule leaf pruning in mid-summer. The roots and branches should be trimmed in the fall. One rule to remember is that you don’t have to remove all the leaves if you are replanting the Japanese maple bonsai. Check the wounds after pruning and be sure to monitor all of them.

Jade Bonsai

This tree likes to be kept indoors at a warm temperature so it can get a lot of natural sunlight; however, jade can also withstand low light intensity. The jade bonsai is a very popular houseplant due to the variety of places that can be kept indoors. Jade should be repotted every two years in a bigger pot. Be sure to trim a third of the root system to avoid restricting the root every time you repot. When repotting, you must use new soil and peat dung. You can trim the leaves at any time of the year, but don’t cut them all at once. 

If you prune your jade bonsai, the leaves will still be small. Pruning new leaves will stimulate new growth toward the bottom of the tree. Do not prune or trim the bonsai repeatedly within one month to avoid excessive shock. When shaping a jade tree, you should use aluminum wire to avoid bark scars. Jade bonsai substructures are stiffer compared to other bonsai trees, so the branches can separate if they bend back immediately.

Hawaiian Umbrella Bonsai

This tree contains thick leaves that form a green crown. In spring it blooms with red roses in a beautiful display of colours. This bonsai is strong and adaptable, and therefore easy to maintain. You can grow the Hawaiian umbrella bonsai from cuttings or seeds. When starting a plant, you must provide it with full sunlight to grow thick, dense foliage. Once this is done, you can move it inside to a window or light spot. You may find that the tree tends to drop leaves after moving inside; don’t worry, as this is just a way to get used to the new environment. 

Water is also essential, and your tree should be sprayed or watered every other day. Never let the soil dry up, as this can have harmful effects on plant health. Also do not overwater it! The soil should be soaked and allowed to drain. If you see the leaves turn black, this indicates that you are watering a lot; if tips appear, you are not watering enough.

Conclusion

Bonsai trees can last a long time if cared for properly. Many people don’t stop at a single tree, and you can collect and grow many different varieties from your mini garden. There are many groups dedicated to this hobby where you can share your experience and learn from others.

Bonsai Care, Bonsai Species, Indoor Bonsai Trees

Bald Cypress Bonsai Pruning

Bald Cypress trees tend to grow in wet and swampy soils along riverbanks and flood plains in the wild. Some specimens of bald cypress have been reported to be as old as 1000 years. Despite the fact that these trees love an ample supply of water, they can still grow as far north as southern Canada, New York, and Minnesota. Bald cypress trees make one of the best bonsai trees. As a bonsai owner, you should understand how vital it is to take care of your miniature plant; thus, in this article, we will discuss the bald cypress bonsai pruning.

The Importance of Pruning Bald Cypress Bonsai

Pruning a bald cypress bonsai helps to create a better and stronger tree; however, excess pruning is highly destructive to your cypress bonsai. For perfect pruning, ensure that you cut the back of your bald cypress bonsai at the right time and in the right way.

To rejuvenate a bald cypress bonsai means to trim it; however, it should be done with utmost care. You will have to keep its roots moist as possible; therefore, prune and trim your cuts at a certain angle that will encourage water to run off stumps. Usually, the goal for pruning a bald cypress bonsai should be yearly thinning instead of major thinning, which tends to take place less frequently.

When to Prune Bald Cypress Bonsai

It is highly advisable to let the trunk of your bald cypress bonsai develop well before pruning it; this will prevent a scraggly look. In the wild, bald cypress tends to grow much faster in the ground in warm climates, since it is often found in swampy areas.

When pruning your bald cypress bonsai, you will need to consider a style that will best suit your bonsai. Most bonsai growers have noticed some success in growing their bonsai in several ways, including formal upright, groups, informal upright, twin trunk, slanting, and literati. However, formal upright is considered the best shape, since bald cypress tends to grow in this manner while in the wild.

Bald cypresses are fast-growing trees; as a result, they have to be watched closely. If you fail to keep a close eye on your tree, the wires can potentially damage it significantly. In order to prevent this from happening, you should consider tying down your branches with twine wire. For a better result, you might consider making a slight incision on a larger branch. By doing so, you will enable the tree to pull its branches down, and its wound will heal within a short period.

How to Prune Bald Cypress Bonsai

In order for you to get a good knee on your bonsai, you should grow your bald cypress in wet and swampy soil; you can achieve this by using an undrained deep swampy bonsai pot. You will then allow your tree to grow and develop a thick trunk before cutting its back. This is because bald cypress tends to grow very fast, and wiring tends to damage its back when not watched closely.

New shoots need to be shortened when they start producing lateral growth. When you prune them too early, they will die during the autumn season. It is advisable to prune the branches during autumn or early spring season. Furthermore, bald cypress often produces lots of new buds in its trunk, forks and branches. The buds that are not useful when designing your bonsai need to be removed in its early stage. On the other hand, young branches and twigs can be wired and shaped, since when they age, they become stiff and brittle. To lower the branches, you should use guy wires for the best result.

Conclusion

Pruning is a vital technique used in growing bonsai trees, and the bald cypress bonsai is no different. To have a better result when growing and cultivating your bald cypress bonsai, understanding the pruning technique becomes vital. As we conclude, we hope that this article has been of great assistance when it comes to bald cypress bonsai pruning.